Iconic Timepieces Halocline

A couple of weeks ago, Iconic Timepieces sent me a prototype of their debut model to review ahead of its pre-order release. Since that time, they have planned a few changes. This is not at all uncommon when working with prototypes but it can be confusing for the reader, so I’ll give you the skinny right upfront. I think the Iconic’s overall design concept is sound but there are a couple of planned changes that could sway a few buyers. I’ll explain more as I go along. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline

The Halocline is a 200m diving watch powered by a Swiss Sellita SW200-1, a 26-jewel, 28.8k bph automatic based on ETA 2824-2 architecture. Its 43mm wide stainless steel case puts it on the larger side of things, but not unreasonably so. At 49mm long, it still manages to park itself squarely atop my 6.75” wrist, and 13mm to the flat sapphire bezel and crystal does not appear overly thick when spread across a case this wide.

Iconic Timepieces Halocline wrist shot

Still, the Halocline is clearly a sports watch that conveys a weighty presence that is enhanced by its distinctive horn lugs. Where most lugs taper inward, these flare out, creating an angular, boxy shape even as they curve downwards. I’d normally associate this look with vintage dress pieces, not tool watches, but it works. With chiseled angles and a brushed finish, these horns come off as more ornery than ornamental. This is going to be the element people either love or hate. Personally, I’m pleased to see Iconic doing something a little different from the dive watch norm. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline

A tall bezel with deep flutes offers easy grip and firm movement through its 120-click rotation. The upper edge is rounded, allowing the brushed groves to wrap into the top of the bezel. Right next to it, however, is the similarly fluted screw-down crown, which does not share the same pattern, and which is polished on the edge and brushed only on its signed head. It is not a big deal, but this small disconnect seems like a lost opportunity to me. Better symmetry between the two elements would have gone a long way. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline

Flipping the watch over, you will discover that the bottom of the case is polished, which is a little odd. Not bad, mind you. Just odd because it is generally hidden and lends nothing to the overall design. The screw-down case back is brushed and engraved with the Iconic logo. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline case back

Back up front, things get more interesting. In addition to the gray dial pictured here, Iconic will offer green, blue, and red. First off, the ombré dial is just lovely, the dark perimeter highlighting the white index and applied diamond-shaped markers. Paired as it is with the white, full-lume, sapphire insert, it looks almost frosty. Next, needle-thin polished and lumed lance hands and a diamond-tipped, logo-tailed second hand. Finally, C3 SuperLuminova lights it up like a torch, but only on the prototype. The end product will use BGW9 for a whiter white in the daytime and a blue glow at night. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline lume

To my eye, the Halocline’s face is its best feature; distinctive, stylish, and clean. It is also one of the aspects due to change. Production models will have a larger, more conventional sword handset for better visibility. As you can see from the rendering below, the new hands will still harmonize with the markers, and with more surface area for lume down their length, they should appear longer as well. It’s the right decision. 
That’s not all. Iconic’s “IT” logo may be applied instead of printed and, as you might have already noticed, the name of the watch will change. The “Hampton Bay” monicker on the prototype will now be “Halocline,” a name that sounds far cooler and cannot be confused with other brands’ watches or ceiling fans. Oh, and one more thing, the model name might be smaller to allow “Automatic” and “200M/660FT” to be larger and arranged on two additional lines. These decisions are not yet final. Again, it all makes good sense, but you are going to have to take it on faith. 

Iconic Timepieces Halocline

The last area for examination and revision is the bracelet. Finished products will have the same solid, H-link design, and signed flip-lock clasp, but it will taper from 22mm to 18mm and screws will replace the pre-production split-pins. What won’t change, is the shape of the fitted end links that don’t quite match the shape of the lugs and protrude just beyond their trailing edge. I have to say, it bugs me. A fitted end link should fit in all aspects. This one does not. Iconic is working with its bracelet supplier on a solution, but once more, it is not yet available to evaluate.

All in all, the Halocline has some great elements and unique look; however, the finished product will not be entirely what is pictured here, so you might need to exercise your imagination before you buy. 

Pre-orders for the Halocline will begin March 1, 2020, at $450. After the first 75, the price will go up to $480. After April 15 when the pre-order period ends, the price will go up to $675. For that, buyers will get the watch, a travel case, and a strap tool. Iconic will provide more information on how and where to order when the date approaches so if you want to get in early on this one, head over to IconicTimepiece.com and sign up for notices. ⬩


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