Blacklist Divematic

Review and photos by Mike Razak

I was surprised by the Blacklist Divematic. I wasn’t expecting the level of finish and overall quality that arrived in my mailbox. On paper and in more generic product photos, it has a very “just another dive watch” vibe that robs it of deserved plaudits. According to the man behind the brand, this is an unfortunately common reaction. People don’t realize how good the watch is until they’ve got it in their hands, on their wrists. So, let me start here by saying that whatever impressions you have of the Blacklist Divematic, don’t let what you’ve seen fool you: this is a seriously good watch.

Blacklist Divematic

Blacklist Watches was founded by Justin Eterovich in 2013 as a college side hustle, but after he graduated, the brand was so successful that he went full-time. Building off the success of the Blacklist marque, the brand has also established Aquanero, Archon, and Harbinger as outlets for designs that don’t really fit under Blacklist. The Divematic is the most recent offering from Blacklist and comes in a variety of colors; I had the cobalt navy and meteorite colorways in for review.

Blacklist Divematic

The 43mm case is startlingly elegant, especially for a dive watch and especially for its size. The keys are the twin polished chamfers running along the top and bottom edge of the midcase, stretching from lug to lug and expanding over the crown guards. Another added facet is the polished chamfer on the interior of the lugs—quite a nice touch that sets the Divematic apart not just from other divers, but from most watches. And at only 12mm thick with lugs that drop below the caseback, the otherwise brush-finished watch hugs the wrist perfectly. A sloped bezel helps the watch wear well both on the weekend and under the cuff—if divers at the office are your thing.

Blacklist Divematic

The insert on the ridged bezel is lumed (though not as brightly as the dial), matched to the dial, and operates perfectly, with a satisfying click (120 of them) and no back play. There was a bit of misalignment on the two models I had in, but I was able to see many examples with perfect alignment; misalignments seem to be the exception as opposed to the rule (unlike with Seiko). The screw-down crown at 3 o’clock, nestled in the crown guards and emblazoned with the Blacklist ‘B’, is easy to operate and ensures 200M water resistance. With this case, all its slopes and seemingly perfect sizing mean you don’t feel the full size of the 43mm.

Blacklist Divematic

A flat sapphire crystal furthers the modern aesthetic and gives way to a wonderfully patterned dial that is engaging without distracting. Obviously, if you go for the meteorite dial, you’ll have tons of light play on the various striations and fragments. The wave dial is well-defined and low-relief, catching all the light thrown at it, without compromising legibility. The dial is a custom design and achieves its goal of seeming like an illusion as if it’s in motion. There could’ve been much more dial text, but the Blacklist Divematic exercises a bit of restraint, with small text at 6 o’clock and the logo and brand at 12.

Blacklist Divematic

The hour markers and hands are equally bold and very well lumed (Super-LumiNova). As I mentioned above, the lume on the dial and hands overpower the bezel lume to a degree that makes the bezel seem lackluster. The lollipop seconds hand is a bright orange to match the other orange accents on the watch. I’m a fan of this dial: it’s big and open, balanced (no date!), and highly legible.

Blacklist Divematic lume

On the reverse, the watch features a screw-down caseback with alternating finishes and a sapphire display. Seen through the back is the Japanese Miyota 9039. This is one of my favorite movements used in the microbrand world. It’s a proper no date mechanism, which means you’ve got no dead crown position, and it’s extremely robust as it’s based on the tried and true 9015. On top of that, it’s a good deal thinner than some of the alternatives, which is why the Divematic is 12mm thick instead of 14mm.

Blacklist Divematic

It’s not often that a bracelet gets me hyped, but here we are, fully hyped, near the end of the review. Yes, you can pretty easily pair this watch with any strap of your choice (depending on the dial you choose), but the fully-brushed, oyster style bracelet is fantastic. Fitted integrated end links mean no searching your watch box for strays and a perfect fit with the watch case. The bracelet comes off and on easily and is easy to adjust, with standard pins securing the solid links.

Blacklist Divematic

The real hero here is the clasp. If you’re familiar with modern Rolex clasps, you’ll recognize this one, as it’s a clone. A branded flip-lock secures the main clasp, which features a spring-loaded end which is pulled up to release the clasp. Hidden microadjustments are made using a spring bar, and keep the clasp looking sleek. What’s important is that you know this is a solid bracelet that’ll never leave you worried about the watches security on your wrist.

Blacklist Divematic

The Blacklist Divematic sells for $749. And I think it’s perfectly priced. It’s not a steal. It’s not a rip-off. It’s spot-on. You’re getting every dollar’s worth. I’d love the bezel lume to be slightly better. But it’s readable in the dark, and that’s all it has to be. If you want the meteorite dial, you’ll have to cough up an extra $500, which is a heavy premium to pay for a little bit of texture and shimmer—plus, you’d have to give up the great wave dial.

Blacklist Divematic

The Divematic is available in nine different color combinations, two of which are the pricier meteorite dial. While I’m partial to a few, you probably can’t go wrong with any of them. If you’re sold, you can head over to the Blacklist site and get yours now. Enjoy that wave dial.


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